Science Friday

Science Friday

Science Friday and WNYC Studios

Brain fun for curious people.

Categories: Science & Medicine

Listen to the last episode:

How Will Doctors Train For A Post-Roe World?

It’s been one week since Roe v Wade was overturned by the Supreme Court. Many people are still wrapping their heads around what this overturn means for their states— and for their lives.

For physicians and medical professionals, there’s another level of fear and concern about what practicing in a world without Roe v. Wade will mean. Questions are circulating about how training for OB/GYN’s may change, or if abortion care will stop being taught in medical school in states that do not allow the practice. For years, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has warned that a shortage of gynecologists will persist, and many in the industry fear the overturn will exacerbate this issue. 

Joining Ira to talk about how the Roe overturn could impact training of medical professionals is Dr. Maria Isabel Rodriguez, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon.

 

Why Are Female Athletes At A Higher Risk Of ACL Injuries?

During 2021’s NCAA March Madness tournament, photos and videos from inside the athletes’ weight rooms went viral. The images showed the difference between what was available to the men’s and women’s teams. 

The men’s weight room was chock full of fitness training devices. For the female athletes, the only weights were six pairs of dumbbells.

This was just one example of a harmful stereotype that has persisted about women in sports: strength training is for men, not for women. This kind of thinking is not only wrong, but can have serious consequences.

Research shows female athletes are more prone to certain injuries, most strikingly ACL injuries. Women and girls are up to six times as likely to get an ACL injury compared to boys and men. Joanne Parsons, physical therapist and associate professor at the University of Manitoba, says, “A high school girl who plays basketball or soccer for one season, so let’s say three to four months-ish, will have a 1% chance of rupturing their ACL.”

Parsons and her colleague Stephanie Coen, health geographer and associate professor at the University of Nottingham, UK, join Ira to talk about how the way athletic training works now puts women and girls at a disadvantage, and what can be done to better protect athletes.

Watch the live call-in at sciencefriday.com.

 

The Best Science Books To Read This Summer, 2022 Edition

Whether you’re on the beach this summer, taking a staycation, or whiling away too many hours spent delayed in airports, you’ll want something to read. Ira and guest authors Riley Black and Deb Blum are here for you, with recommendations for the best books to soak in during the season of escapism. 

The full list of book recommendations can be found at sciencefriday.com.

 

Transcripts for each segment will be available a week after the show at sciencefriday.com.

 

Previous episodes

  • 793 - Summer Science Books, Effect of Roe on Obstetric Care, Female Athletic Injuries. July 1, 2022, Part 2 
    Fri, 01 Jul 2022 - 0h
  • 792 - SCOTUS Restricts EPA, Scientist Rebellion Protests, Kansas Wheat Problems, Early Science Films. July 1, 2022, Part 1 
    Fri, 01 Jul 2022 - 0h
  • 791 - HIPAA Explained, Trans Research, Queer Scientists. June 24, 2022, Part 2 
    Fri, 24 Jun 2022 - 0h
  • 790 - Roe V. Wade Overturned, Animals’ Amazing Sensory Abilities. June 24, 2022, Part 1 
    Fri, 24 Jun 2022 - 0h
  • 789 - The Rise Of Mammals And A Cephalopod Celebration. June 17, 2022, Part 2 
    Fri, 17 Jun 2022 - 0h
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